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Topic: udder pimples  (Read 3245 times)
amyrob01
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« on: January 18, 2009, 10:36:55 PM »

Dot has these oocasional pimples on her udder. They seem to scab over and go away and they break out new ones for a  few weeks.  Any suggestions?  Will antiobiotic salve help?
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Amy

~The bend in the road is not the end of the road unless you refuse to take the turn~

Granite Lake Goats
PB Sannens and Nubians
cariboujaguar
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« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2009, 11:41:35 PM »

isn't that a staph infection? Kim,(My enchanted acres) has told me how to deal with that before... I know alot ofpeople on here know how to treat that. I use Grace Harbor Farms MSM cream on that, although I've never had it in my own herd... works wonders Smiley
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Sandie
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« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2009, 12:06:42 AM »

those can be caused by a couple of different things the most common is they lay down in some hay with little stickers and just get little slivers or stickers that get infected ( just like a sliver in people will ) cleaning the udder  well ( soap and water ) and perhaps spraying with alcohol then use an antibiotic ointment would be the best way to clear it up .  the other cause i know of is called cow pox and is from a virus it is not usually serious when a goat gets it and will clear up in a few weeks on its own but if you think it might be that i would advise not using the milk for human consumption till after it is cleared up. it is related to the chicken pox virus and as far as i know not a problem for people but probably better safe than sorry.  carabou the msm cream from grace harbor has several of the essential oils in it that are known to be healing agents so i bet that would be a good thing to use on it !
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Sunshine
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« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2009, 12:24:29 AM »

One of mine had something like that one time and I just massaged and oil with Lavender and Tea tree oil in it and they were gone with in about 2 weeks..
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imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
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Posts: 17290


Southern Louisiana


« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2009, 04:49:01 AM »

Amy if it is goat pox..I'm not sure if it's the same in goats as it is in cows, but pox in cows is highly contagious to humans..so you could get it from her if it is pox.

Sore mouth, goat pox, or a sliver are the three things this could be.  Sore mouth and pox are contagious.  Sore mouth will run it's course through the herd and the infected doe..not too much you can do about it.  Pox I would wash the teats and clean them well with an antibacterial soap and them massage some oil as Sunshine said into them.  Sore mouth and Pox are both viral and will have to run their course.  Wear rubber gloves when treating it.  The sliver issue, yes some triple antibiotic ointment such as Neosporin (or a generic of it works as good too) applied a few times a day will end that soon enough.

I doubt this is a sliver since one goes away and another comes back and doesn't go away for a few weeks.  Sore mouth takes about 2 weeks to run it's course.
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~ Birdie ~
dragonlair
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Posts: 8061



« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2009, 05:36:54 AM »

Mine get it during the winter when they are inside most of the time. Its from the hay/bedding breaking the skin and letting staph take hold. I usually just wash it off with warm udder wash or betadine and put either udder balm on it or spray the udder with Fight Bac.

Cow pox was the germ they first vaccinated people with to prevent small pox. Same family, so if a person had a mild case of cow pox, they never got small pox. The dairy girls who used to milk cows way back then would never seem to get small pox when there was an outbreak and everyone else was dying. Someone decided to try giving people cow pox and found it worked. Soon after they devised a way to inoculate using a sharp piece of ivory and the stuff that came out of a cow pox blister. The person would develop a cow pox blister and be immune from small pox. They would harvest the stuff from the blister and inoculate more people. I think they could do 4 (maybe 7, I forgot) people from 1 blister.

And there, folks, is your farm history lesson for the day. My brain is full of useless trivia such as that. I have to get rid of it once in a while or my brain will explode. Wink Roll Eyes

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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
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Posts: 17290


Southern Louisiana


« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2009, 05:48:25 AM »

Mine get it during the winter when they are inside most of the time. Its from the hay/bedding breaking the skin and letting staph take hold. I usually just wash it off with warm udder wash or betadine and put either udder balm on it or spray the udder with Fight Bac.

Cow pox was the germ they first vaccinated people with to prevent small pox. Same family, so if a person had a mild case of cow pox, they never got small pox. The dairy girls who used to milk cows way back then would never seem to get small pox when there was an outbreak and everyone else was dying. Someone decided to try giving people cow pox and found it worked. Soon after they devised a way to inoculate using a sharp piece of ivory and the stuff that came out of a cow pox blister. The person would develop a cow pox blister and be immune from small pox. They would harvest the stuff from the blister and inoculate more people. I think they could do 4 (maybe 7, I forgot) people from 1 blister.

And there, folks, is your farm history lesson for the day. My brain is full of useless trivia such as that. I have to get rid of it once in a while or my brain will explode. Wink Roll Eyes

Useless heck, that's good info to have. Smiley  I've had cow pox more times than I can count and I did receive the small pox vaccination..it's very much unbearable to endure.  I've had it more than once too.  However, I've had chicken pox more than once as well.  I'm just one of those odd cases.
 
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~ Birdie ~
Sally P
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New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2009, 08:17:40 AM »

You know---those little pimples can mean that she's just getting an irritation from the bedding or it could mean that there are some mites or little biting bugs in the bedding.  As it appears and then goes away---I think it's much more of an irritation/allergy thing than goat pox.  I would just rub some tea tree oil on it and not worry too much.
It's sort of like teenagers and acne.
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Ashlee H
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« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2009, 10:00:30 AM »

I always heard if a goat gets sore mouth, or goat pox, after it runs it's course, that goat won't ever have it again - is this true?

If that is true, and this keeps reacuring with this goat, it wouldn't be sore mouth, or goat pox, but probably just from an irratation, like the others said.
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Aimeeday1972
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« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2009, 10:07:59 AM »

Most viruses leave the person (and goat, I assume) with a lifelong immunity, whereas bacteria do not. That's why staph comes back over and over, but not chicken pox or measles. There are of course, exceptions, like birdie (and me, I've had chicken pox twice too) and exceptions in the virus. I'm thinking of herpes. Does anyone know if goats get herpes? It is related to chickenpox, there are hundreds of strains, and it is a recurrent infection. Do these bisters seem painful?
I'd also advise using gloves whenever you touch this goat's udder, for milking or whatever, until you know for sure what this is.
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pearplum
Herdmasters
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Posts: 1451


The Lincolnshire Fens. England.


« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2009, 10:09:49 AM »


     I think it is a sort of teenage thing becasue I have had a couple who have had horrible crusty rashes on their udders as yearlings and then grown out of it as they got older. "Goat Pox" is a confusing term to use because it means different things in different places . There is a very nasty form which causes fever and can even be fatal and then there's the sort we get over here which is just a few pimples and nothing much else. A bit like the difference between measles which can be really bad and "German Measles" which (provided you are not pregnant) is usually no gret problem.

  Whatever you choose to call it I think you will find a few massages with tea tree and lavender will clear it up. Just out of interest , and I haven't tried this, an old country remedy for this is to rub the area with some petroleum jelly to which you have added chopped stinging nettles. OUCH!! :Y
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Ashlee H
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« Reply #11 on: January 19, 2009, 10:16:52 AM »

Hey, thanks Aimeeday - I thought that I heard if a goat (or anything) gets some sort of pox, they build a life long immunity to it, I just wanted to make sure.

Oh, yeah, I have heard of special cases were someone may get it twice. I think someone in our family had that - can't remember who though???  ???

I would guess it was probably from some iratation since it keeps reacurring to this goat, then. Is she the only one with this in your herd?
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amyrob01
Caprine Guru
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Posts: 274


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« Reply #12 on: January 19, 2009, 06:01:56 PM »

We'll start w/ some antibiotic salve and go from there.  It has always cleared on its own but I am selling her and want her to look GOOD!
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Amy

~The bend in the road is not the end of the road unless you refuse to take the turn~

Granite Lake Goats
PB Sannens and Nubians
Sandie
Guest
« Reply #13 on: January 19, 2009, 09:49:21 PM »

amy from your description i am sure that it is not soremouth. but soremouth was mentioned and questions asked so i will answer that with what i have observed in my herd.  soremouth is a virus and it is related to herpes. humans can get it too so if it is suspected the person handeling the goats should be very carefull to not touch anything on themselves until after wash up with good soap and disinfectant ( i used ivory dish soap and a splash of clorox when we have had it in our herd ) rince well then use a hand sanitizer like purell ( alcohol based) . it usually will show up in late winter or early spring but can be other times of the year. it starts with small scabby sores usually around the goats lips, they can be spread to other parts of the goats body and if you have kids nursing when it is active they often will spread it to moms udder which can  cause of secondary infection causing mastitis so needs to be watched carefully. there is no cure for it , it has to run its course usually about 2 weeks. it can lie dormant in the soil for up to 50 years so once it is there it is not likely that you could get rid of it.
once your herd has it they will have imunity to it but not for a lifetime. after the first time we had it here we didn't get it again for about 5 years , that time the goats that were here when we had it the first time got very mild cases of it just a couple of sores and they healed and were gone in just about 4 days, the goats that had been born shortly after the first time we had it also had milder cases of it . the goats that were from the next years kidding season or had been purchased since then all got worse cases with more sores and it lasted the full 2 weeks.
there is a vacine for it but after doing some research we decided there was not any point in giving it as it would actually give them a mild case of it ( modified live virus vacine) and it had to be given annually  and it was not fully effective as  some goats  would still get it later in the year.
you can apply an ointment to the sores if you want to help keep them from drying out and breaking open so often ,  ( more practical on sores on the udder than on the mouth ) and i have herd of a couple of herbal things that can be put on to relive the discomfort but don't remember what they are and haven't trried them . perhaps someone else knows and will post about it.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2009, 09:52:49 PM by Sandie » Logged
cariboujaguar
Guest
« Reply #14 on: January 19, 2009, 10:02:32 PM »

Boy I better watch my goats closer when I play kissy face with them... how to explain I got herpe's from kissing goats LOL I guess that's better then getting it from kissing guys though LOL  Wink Kramer has little white hairless patches on his bottom lip, I figured it was from peeing on his mouth, they're healing now... could those be soremouth? Does anyone have any pics? because if they are, then I've kissed him since then LOL (he's not pee pee anymore, in my defense )
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