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Topic: decreased milk production  (Read 1646 times)
amyrob01
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« on: January 14, 2009, 09:47:19 AM »

I just bred these 2 girls in mid december and the last few weeks their production really went down.  No outright signs of mastitis, either.  Is this pretty common after conceiving.  What is the best advice to bring them back up?  Increased their ration some last few days.  Have been massaging a bit on the stand after milking.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2009, 09:49:32 AM by amyrob01 » Logged

Amy

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« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2009, 09:54:56 AM »

I have some that wont quit milking pregnant or not and I have one that as soon as she is pregnant she dries up. You may try increasing her grain a little but it may also come back on its own.. Is her udder swollen or tight? Is it really cold and maybe they are putting all their food into warming up. I am sure someone else will have more advice.
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amyrob01
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« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2009, 10:31:12 AM »

No, just more like they feel after they have been milked out.  No tenderness anywhere.
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Amy

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myenchantedacres
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« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2009, 10:44:02 AM »

How long have they been in milk? Sometimes their milk will decrease the longer they are into their lactation, 8, 10 months. I had a few this past year, that as soon as they were bred, and had been milking 9-10 months dropped off like a rock. Which was nice as I was getting ready to start to dry them up..But it was hard getting that last milk test done. Just what I have noticed with my girls.

Kim
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Pinsprings
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« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2009, 12:27:02 PM »

I think that it depends on the goat. It differs from goat to goat. The one that I am milking now kidded last spring, she is a FF. She escaped and got out with the buck about a month ago. I am not sure she was in heat but for the last couple of weeks she has doubled her milk production and I haven't got a clue. Other than I am giving her two tums and a children's chewable vitamin everyday as a treat.
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Sally P
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« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2009, 04:58:58 PM »

Ad doe's production will normally drop off in the Fall.  They stay in peak production (which happens about 8 weeks after kidding) for about 2 to 3 months; then their production will fall off some and they should stay around that amount until dried off.  It's not unusual for a doe to drop off more after breeding.  We dry ours off before breeding if possible so that their bodies aren't trying to cope with two things--milk production and pregnancy (plus the cold weather). 
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« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2009, 09:48:58 PM »

one thing too, I found after I bred one, I thought it was her cycle, but turned out to be the cold, she wasn't drinking enough, even offering her warm molasses water and warm water....She just wasn't into drinking 'cause it was cold I figure...But when the weather got nice again, she picked back up....
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amyrob01
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« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2009, 11:37:50 PM »

They both freshened in April.  Ok, sounds like you all are pretty darn smart.  I just hadn't experienced this so noticeable.  I was planning on milking them til mid march.  I guess if they only give a little, they still need the grain on the stand.  So, they can come and visit me and I can watch them develop.  That is always fun to see when you think they are actually starting to show!  Lucky for me Windy and Thumbelina are pumping it out.
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Amy

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Sandie
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« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2009, 01:05:43 AM »

i have one that will not dry off till she is bred cant even get her to slow down but within a week after she breeds she drops to less than half of her 'normal' . it really is an individual goat thing.  as they get further along in their pregnancy if you are still milking and they start being fussy about being milked that is probably them trying to say it is time to dry off.
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WindsorFarmer
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« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2009, 08:59:04 PM »

You might find this interesting.  We are milking four does now, Heide kidded last in 06 and is still producing about 2/3rds of a quart a day (peek is ~2&1/2 qrts), Winter, second freshing this past March is giving about 1/2 cup, Jemima, first freshener, we get half - that's about 2/3 of a qrt, and Psyche - with a precocious udder, is down to about a pint a day from 2&1/2 qrts.  Peek pruction from all of them is around 2&1/2 gallons a day

They are all down in production and we expected this.  We're hoping to not breed any except Psyche this season.  We'll see if she takes this time.

Mike
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amyrob01
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« Reply #10 on: February 16, 2009, 11:05:25 PM »

Did you mean 2/3 qt or 2/3 gallon?
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Amy

~The bend in the road is not the end of the road unless you refuse to take the turn~

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Sally P
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« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2009, 08:33:18 AM »

The real secret to drying does off is to make sure that you do not strip them out.  When you decide to start drying off, leave at lest a third of the milk in each side of the udder.  Leaving milk in the udder tells them that they don't have to make as much milk.  Also remember to go to milking once a day for a couple of weeks, then every other day, and then every third day.  Some does will dry off abruptly, but most won't and the gradual drying off process makes things much easier on them.  The really important part is to not milk them out completely!!!!
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